Exposure-response relationships for force and repetition, and CTS

Jay M. Kapellusch, Carisa Harris-Adamson, Fred Gerr, Stephen Bao, Ann Marie Dale, Arun Garg, Ellen Eisen, Bradley Evanoff, Barbara Silverstein, Kurt T. Hegmann, Matthew S. Thiese, David Rempel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), though widely investigated, remains a troubling and costly disease for both employers and workers. Recent studies have consistently shown that combinations of force and repetition are occupational risk factors for CTS. However, it remains unclear which of these two factors is primarily responsible for the increase in risk. This study uses pooled prospective data to compare exposure-response relationships for peak force and several measures of repetition, including the integrated measure of peak force and hand activity level, the ACGIH TLV for HAL. Results suggest that peak force acts as an independent risk factor for CTS, while repetition is only a risk factor if the exertions are "forceful". Thus, it appears that applied hand/wrist force is the dominant occupational physical exposure risk factor for CTS.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1234-1238
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2015-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

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