Examining the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention to improve cognitive function in a population of older adults living with HIV: a pilot study

Judy A. Frain, Ling Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this randomized-controlled pilot study was to explore the effectiveness of a home-based computerized cognitive training intervention in improving cognitive function in a population of older adults with mild cognitive impairment who are living with HIV. Methods: In all, 24 participants were enrolled in this study. All study participants were impaired [defined as Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score < 26]; 12 were randomly assigned to a computer-training intervention group and 12 to a control group. The intervention group used a home-based computerized cognitive training program for 8 weeks, while the control group received health-related newsletter via email and follow-up phone calls. Cognitive function was measured at study entry, immediately post intervention, and 8 and 16 weeks post intervention Results: This study achieved a 92% retention rate, losing two persons from the intervention group. Participants in the intervention group scored significantly higher on cognitive testing immediately post intervention compared to the control group: F(1, 19) = 4.92, p = 0.04. The partial Eta squared of 0.32 indicates a small to moderate effect size. Discussion: Cognitive improvement was seen immediately after the intervention, and cognitive improvement was still evident 16 weeks post intervention. Cognitive training could be considered as an option for older adults with HIV experiencing mild cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-28
Number of pages10
JournalTherapeutic Advances in Infectious Disease
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Cognitive Impairment
  • HIV
  • MoCA
  • Older Adults

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