Evidence for separate perceptual reactivation and search processes during remembering

Mark E. Wheeler, Gordon L. Shulman, Randy L. Buckner, Francis M. Miezin, Katerina Velanova, Steven E. Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Remembering involves the coordinated recruitment of strategic search processes and processes involved in reconstructing the content of the past experience. In the present study we used a cueing paradigm based on event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to separate activity in the initial preparation phases of retrieval from later phases during which retrieval search ensued, and detailed auditory and visual memories were reconstructed. Results suggest a dissociation among inferior temporal (IT) and parieto-occipital (PO) processing regions in how they were influenced by preparatory cues prior to remembering, and indicate a dissociation in how they were influenced by the subsequent validity of those cues during remembering. Regions in IT cortex appeared to show search-related activity during retrieval, as well as robust modality effects, but they were not influenced by preparatory cues. These findings suggest a specific role for IT regions in reconstruction of visual details during remembering. While dorsal regions in parietal and superior occipital cortex also appeared to show search-related activity as well as robust modality effects, they were also influenced by preparatory cues during the retrieval phase, and to a lesser degree during the cue phase. These findings indicate a role in integrating perceptual reactivation and search processes during remembering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)949-959
Number of pages11
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Cueing
  • Episodic memory
  • Parieto-occipital
  • Remembering
  • Retrieval

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