Establishing Sickle Cell Disease Stroke Prevention Teams in Africa is Feasible: Program Evaluation Using the RE-AIM Framework

Djamila L. Ghafuri, Shehu U. Abdullahi, Abdu H. Dambatta, Jamil Galadanci, Musa A. Tabari, Halima Bello-Manga, Nura Idris, Hauwa Inuwa, Aliyu Tijjani, Aisha A. Suleiman, Binta W. Jibir, Safiya Gambo, Awwal I. Gambo, Yusuf Khalifa, Lawal Haliru, Sani Abdulrasheed, Mohammed A. Zakari, Brittany C. Greene, Edwin Trevathan, Lori C. JordanMuktar H. Aliyu, Ana A. Baumann, Michael R. DeBaun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework to evaluate a Stroke Prevention Team's readiness to prevent strokes in children with sickle cell anemia living in northern Nigeria. The NIH sponsored Stroke Prevention Trial in Nigeria included a goal of a sustainable stroke prevention program. The program's 1-year reach for transcranial Doppler screening was 14.7% (4710/32,000) of which 6.0% (281/4710) had abnormal velocities (≥ 200 cm/s). All participants with abnormal transcranial Doppler velocities were started on hydroxyurea (effectiveness). The leaders of all 5 hospitals agreed to adopt the program. After 1 year, program-implementation and maintenance rates were 100%, demonstrating the program's feasibility and short-term sustainability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E56-E61
JournalJournal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

Keywords

  • Low-resource setting
  • Nigeria
  • RE-AIM
  • Sickle cell
  • Stroke prevention

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