Epley maneuver for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Evidence synthesis for guidelines for reasonable and appropriate care in the emergency department

Danya Khoujah, James G. Naples, Lucas Oliveira J. e Silva, Jonathan A. Edlow, Danielle J. Gerberi, Christopher R. Carpenter, Fernanda Bellolio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Canalith repositioning maneuvers (such as the Epley maneuver) are recommended by specialty guidelines for management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) yet are frequently underutilized in the emergency department (ED). Methods: We conducted a systematic review (SR) of SRs to summarize the evidence of Epley maneuver for the treatment of posterior canal (pc) BPPV in any setting. We included SRs of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared Epley to control in adult patients with pc-BPPV. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were screened in duplicate. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) assessment was used to rate certainty of evidence. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. Meta-analysis of individual studies was conducted with random and fixed effects. Results: From 2228 titles, seven SRs were selected for quality assessment. One review was of higher methodological quality, included only RCTs, and was the most current and comprehensive. Five of the 11 RCTs of the review, including 312 patients with pc-BPPV diagnosed by Dix–Hallpike, were relevant to our question. Meta-analysis of four RCTs (251 patients) showed the use of Epley (compared to control) was associated with higher complete resolution of vertigo at 1 week (OR 7.19, 95% CI 1.52–33.98, moderate certainty). Meta-analysis of three RCTs (195 patients) showed the use of Epley was associated with higher conversion to negative Dix–Hallpike at 1 week (OR 6.67, 95% CI 1.52–33.98, moderate certainty). The number-needed-to-treat was three. Meta-analysis of the outcomes at 1 month, and when observational studies were included, showed similar results. No serious adverse effects were reported. Conclusions: Symptoms of pc-BPPV improve with the Epley maneuver. Emergency clinicians should become familiar with performing the Epley for BPPV. Further studies on ED implementation and clinician education of Epley are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-516
Number of pages16
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

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