Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling regulates goblet cell production after small bowel resection

Marcus D. Jarboe, Russell J. Juno, Wolfgang Stehr, Nicole P. Bernal, Sherri Profitt, Christopher R. Erwin, Brad W. Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intestinal adaptation is a compensatory response to massive small bowel loss in which there are increased numbers of absorptive enterocytes. However, the generation of secretory epithelial cell subtypes in this process has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the adaptive changes of several small intestinal cell lineage changes in response to massive small bowel resection (SBR). A 75% SBR or sham operation was performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats. On postoperative day 7, the remnant ileum was harvested and immunohistochemical staining for goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells was performed. Cell subtypes were evaluated as cells per micrometer of villus/crypt length and compared among operations. A significant increase in goblet cell density occurred after SBR. Intestinal resection did not alter the number of Paneth and enteroendocrine cells. In additional experiments, inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling was associated with a diminished goblet cell density. The adaptive response of the intestine to massive bowel loss results in an expansion of the goblet cell population in addition to greater numbers of absorptive enterocytes. Although the mechanism and purpose for selective expansion of these stem cell-derived lineages are not presently known, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling appears to be a common pathway.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-97
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Intestinal resection
  • Short bowel syndrome
  • Stem cells

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling regulates goblet cell production after small bowel resection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this