Engraftment of cells from porcine islets of langerhans following transplantation of pig pancreatic primordia in non-immunosuppressed diabetic rhesus macaques

Sharon A. Rogers, Piyush Tripathi, Thalachallour Mohanakumar, Helen Liapis, Feng Chen, Michael R. Talcott, Chad Faulkner, Marc R. Hammerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transplantation therapy for human diabetes is limited by the toxicity of immunosuppressive drugs. If toxicity can be minimized, there will still be a shortage of human donor organs. Xenotransplantation of porcine islets is a strategy to overcome supply problems. Xenotransplantation in mesentery of pig pancreatic primordia obtained very early during organogenesis [embryonic day 28 (E28)] is a way to obviate the need for immune-suppression in rats or rhesus macaques and to enable engraftment of a cell component originating from porcine islets implanted beneath the renal capsule of rats. Here we show engraftment in kidney of insulin and porcine proinsulin mRNA expressing cells following implantation of porcine islets beneath the renal capsule of diabetic rhesus macaques transplanted previously with E28 pig pancreatic primordia in mesentery. Donor cell engraftment is confirmed using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the porcine X chromosome and supported by glucose-stimulated insulin release in vitro. Cells from islets do not engraft in the kidney without prior transplantation of E28 pig pancreatic primordia in mesentery. This is the first report of engraftment following transplantation of porcine islets in non-immunosuppressed, immune-competent non-human primates. The data are consistent with tolerance to a cell component of porcine islets induced by previous transplantation of E28 pig pancreatic primordia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOrganogenesis
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Non-human primates
  • Transplantation
  • Xenotransplantation
  • β cell

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