Endurance training in older men and women. I. Cardiovascular responses to exercise

D. R. Seals, J. M. Hagberg, B. F. Hurley, A. A. Ehsani, J. O. Holloszy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

278 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of prolonged endurance training on maximal O2 uptake capacity (VO2(max)) and its determinants were studied in 11 older individuals (63 ± 2 yr). The subjects were evaluated before training, after 6 mo of low-intensity (LI) training, and after an additional 6 mo of higher intensity (HI) training. VO2(max) was 25.4 ± 4.6 ml·kg-1·min-1 before training, 28.2 ± 5.2 ml·kg-1·min-1 after LI training (P < 0.05), and 32.9 ± 7.6 ml·kg-1·min-1 after HI training (P < 0.01), with an overall increase of 30%. The increase in VO2(max) in response to training appeared to be mediated primarily through an increase in maximal arteriovenous O2 difference (P < 0.01), with little augmentation of maximal cardiac output (Q̇) (P > 0.05). At the same absolute work rates, stroke volume was higher (P < 0.05); heart rate (HR) blood pressure (BP), and systemic vascular resistance were lower (P < 0.05); and Q̇ and arteriovenous O2 difference were unchanged after training. At the same relative work rates, arteriovenous O2 difference was higher (P < 0.01); BP and systemic vascular resistance were lower (P < 0.05); and HR, Q̇, and stroke volume did not change significantly. These findings also show that older individuals can adapt to prolonged endurance training with a large increase in aerobic power.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1024-1029
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Volume57
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Endurance training in older men and women. I. Cardiovascular responses to exercise'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this