Encoding strategy training and self-reported everyday prospective memory in people with Parkinson disease: a randomized-controlled trial

Susan Goedeken, Cathryne Potempa, Eliza M. Prager, Erin R. Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To compare the effects of laboratory-based training in implementation intentions (II; experimental strategy) and verbal rehearsal (VR; control strategy) on self-reported everyday prospective memory among people with Parkinson disease (PD) and to investigate potential correlates of change in self-reported everyday prospective memory in response to this training. Method: This was a randomized-controlled trial. Participants with mild to moderate PD without dementia underwent one session of training in either II (n = 25) or VR (n = 27). Then they were instructed to use their strategy as much as possible in their everyday lives to help them remember to do things. The Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire Prospective Scale (PRMQ-Pro) administered at baseline and one month after training assessed training-related change in self-reported everyday prospective memory. Baseline depressive symptoms, perceptions of the strategy (credibility, expectancy), prospective memory-related awareness, global cognition, and disease severity were correlated to PRMQ-Pro Change scores (post minus pre) to determine their association with response to training. Results: The VR group’s PRMQ-Pro scores declined from pre to post training, while the II group’s remained stable (p = .03). This effect was driven by change in self-cued everyday prospective memory tasks. Higher baseline depressive symptoms, treatment expectancy, and global cognition related to better response to training in the II group (rs ≤ −.40, ps ≤ .05). Conclusions: II training may prevent everyday prospective memory decline among people with PD. In addition, people with higher depression, stronger expectations of improvement from strategy training, or better global cognition may benefit the most from II training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1282-1302
Number of pages21
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2018

Keywords

  • Parkinson disease
  • cognitive rehabilitation
  • executive function
  • memory
  • randomized-controlled trial

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