Encephalitogenic T-cells increase numbers of CNS T-cells regardless of antigen specificity by both increasing T-cell entry and preventing egress

Jason R. Lees, Julia Sim, John H. Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study utilized an adoptive transfer model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction in mice to characterize the mechanisms involved in CNS accumulation of transferred and host T-cells. Using a flow cytometric technique, we examined phenotypic characteristics of CNS T-cells following disease initiation and the role of T-cell activation in CNS invasion and retention. Host T-cell activation increased cell recruitment and EAE severity. CNS antigen specific T-cells were required to induce T-cell retention within the CNS. Once retention was initiated, CNS T-cells were retained regardless of specificity. This study characterizes mechanisms involved in CNS accumulation of T-cells during EAE pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume220
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2010

Keywords

  • Cell retention
  • Cell trafficking
  • EAE
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • T-cells

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Encephalitogenic T-cells increase numbers of CNS T-cells regardless of antigen specificity by both increasing T-cell entry and preventing egress'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this