Emerging view of the human virome

Kristine M. Wylie, George M. Weinstock, Gregory A. Storch

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

The human virome is the collection of all viruses that are found in or on humans, including both eukaryotic and prokaryotic viruses. Eukaryotic viruses clearly have important effects on human health, ranging from mild, self-limited acute or chronic infections to those with serious or fatal consequences. Prokaryotic viruses can also influence human health by affecting bacterial community structure and function. Therefore, definition of the virome is an important step toward understanding how microbes affect human health and disease. We review progress in virome analysis, which has been driven by advances in high-throughput, deep sequencing technology. Highlights from these studies include the association of viruses with clinical phenotypes and description of novel viruses that may be important pathogens. Together these studies indicate that analysis of the human virome is critical as we aim to understand how microbial communities influence human health and disease. Descriptions of the human virome will stimulate future work to understand how the virome affects long-term human health, immunity, and response to coinfections. Analysis of the virome ultimately may affect the treatment of patients with a variety of clinical syndromes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-290
Number of pages8
JournalTranslational Research
Volume160
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

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