Electrocochleography and cognition are important predictors of speech perception outcomes in noise for cochlear implant recipients

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Abstract

Although significant progress has been made in understanding outcomes following cochlear implantation, predicting performance remains a challenge. Duration of hearing loss, age at implantation, and electrode positioning within the cochlea together explain ~ 25% of the variability in speech-perception scores in quiet using the cochlear implant (CI). Electrocochleography (ECochG) responses, prior to implantation, account for 47% of the variance in the same speech-perception measures. No study to date has explored CI performance in noise, a more realistic measure of natural listening. This study aimed to (1) validate ECochG total response (ECochG-TR) as a predictor of performance in quiet and (2) evaluate whether ECochG-TR explained variability in noise performance. Thirty-five adult CI recipients were enrolled with outcomes assessed at 3-months post-implantation. The results confirm previous studies showing a strong correlation of ECochG-TR with speech-perception in quiet (r = 0.77). ECochG-TR independently explained 34% of the variability in noise performance. Multivariate modeling using ECochG-TR and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores explained 60% of the variability in speech-perception in noise. Thus, ECochG-TR, a measure of the cochlear substrate prior to implantation, is necessary but not sufficient for explaining performance in noise. Rather, a cognitive measure is also needed to improve prediction of noise performance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3083
JournalScientific reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

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