Effects of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty balloon compliance on angiographic and clinical outcomes

Richard G. Bach, Morton J. Kern, Frank V. Aguirre, Thomas J. Donohue, Calvin Bell, Danny Penick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of balloon compliance on the safety and outcome of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is controversial. It has been proposed that PTCA balloons constructed from compliant polymers contribute to an increased risk of angiographic coronary dissection and potentially to adverse clinical results. To determine the effect of balloon material compliance on PTCA outcome, 1,076 PTCA procedures using balloons differing in compliance characteristics (polyethylene teraphthalate [noncompliant], polyethylene intermediately compliant] or polyolefincopolymer [compliant]) were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline clinical, angiographic and procedural variables were similar among the 3 balloon material groups. In the noncompliant, intermediately compliant and compliant groups, the occurrence rates of intimal tears (10, 14 and 10%, respectively; p = NS for all comparisons) and coronary dissection (7, 9 and 8%, respectively; all p = NS) were also equivalent. The rates of acute occlusion, myocardial infarction, emergency bypass surgery and death were low and similar, and likewise unaffected by balloon material. The results provide evidence that the occurrence of adverse outcomes after PTCA is unrelated to balloon material compliance and support the clinical safety of balloons constructed of compliant or noncompliant polymers when used for appropriate coronary interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)904-907
Number of pages4
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume72
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty balloon compliance on angiographic and clinical outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this