Effects of low-frequency biasing on otoacoustic and neural measures suggest that stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions originate near the peak region of the traveling wave

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Abstract

Stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) have been used to study a variety of topics in cochlear mechanics, although a current topic of debate is where in the cochlea these emissions are generated. One hypothesis is that SFOAE generation is predominately near the peak region of the traveling wave. An opposing hypothesis is that SFOAE generation near the peak region is deemphasized compared to generation in the tail region of the traveling wave. A comparison was made between the effect of low-frequency biasing on both SFOAEs and a physiologic measure that arises from the peak region of the traveling wave-the compound action potential (CAP). SFOAE biasing was measured as the amplitude of spectral sidebands from varying bias tone levels. CAP biasing was measured as the suppression of CAP amplitude from varying bias tone levels. Measures of biasing effects were made throughout the cochlea. Results from cats show that the level of bias tone needed for maximum SFOAE sidebands and for 50% CAP reduction increased as probe frequency increased. Results from guinea pigs show an irregular bias effect as a function of probe frequency. In both species, there was a strong and positive relationship between the bias level needed for maximum SFOAE sidebands and for 50% CAP suppression. This relationship is consistent with the hypothesis that the majority of SFOAE is generated near the peak region of the traveling wave.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-28
Number of pages12
JournalJARO - Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amplitude modulation
  • Auditory nerve
  • Basilar membrane
  • Cochlea
  • Compound action potential
  • Low-frequency bias tone
  • Otoacoustic emissions

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