Effects of anxiety and depression on heart disease attributions

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24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cardiac patients' beliefs about the causes of their illness may influence their receptivity to psychosocial interventions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether depression or anxiety influence patients' attributions about the causes of their heart disease. The primary hypothesis was that depressed or anxious patients are more likely to endorse negative emotions as among the causes of their heart disease than are patients who are not depressed or anxious. Sixty-nine patients with documented ischemic heart disease recruited from an exercise stress testing laboratory completed the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and a heart disease attribution checklist. Univariate analyses confirmed that patients who are depressed or anxious are more likely than other patients to endorse negative emotions as causes of their heart disease. Anxiety but not depression was retained as an independent predictor of negative emotion attributions in a logistic regression analysis. We conclude that mood state influences cardiac patients' beliefs about the causes of their heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-29
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2005

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Coronary disease
  • Depression
  • Disease attributions
  • Illness beliefs

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