Effects of a 1.5-tesla static magnetic field on spermatogenesis and embryogenesis in mice

Venkat R. Narra, Roger W. Howell, S. Murty Goddu, Dandamudi V. Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES. There is a trend toward the use of higher magnetic field strengths in magnetic resonance imaging procedures. Considering this trend and the lack of consensus on the biologic effects of static magnetic fields, it is of considerable interest to examine the biologic effects of a 1.5-tesla (T) static magnetic field on spermatogenesis and embryogenesis in mice. METHODS. Male and pregnant female Swiss Webster mice were exposed to a 1.5-T static magnetic field for 30 minutes. Effects on spermatogenesis in male mice were investigated by counting testicular spermheads and epididymal spermhead shape-abnormalities as a function of time after exposure. Pregnant female mice were exposed to the field at the two- cell embryo stage, sacrificed immediately, and the ability of these preimplantation embryos to mature into blastocysts was examined in vitro. RESULTS. Exposure to the static 1.5-T magnetic field caused a statistically significant reduction (15%) in testicular sperm on the 16th and 29th days after exposure. However, the increase in spermhead shape abnormalities above normal control values was minimal. A substantial effect was noted on the development of preimplantation embryos with a survival fraction of 0.56 compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS. A 30-minute exposure to a 1.5-T static magnetic field appears to cause some deleterious effects on spermatogenesis and embryogenesis in mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)586-590
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Radiology
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1996

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