Editorial Commentary: Knee Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Results in Significantly Improved Outcomes in the Majority Patients, but There Is Wide Variability in the Rate at Which Athletes Return to Sports

Noël E. Palumbo, Matthew J. Matava

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is the reconstructive procedure of choice following a total or near-total meniscectomy for the symptomatic patient with a stable, well-aligned knee prior to the onset of degenerative arthritis. Historically, the goals were to eliminate symptoms with activities of daily living and improve longevity of the articular cartilage. However, athletically active individuals are rarely satisfied unless they return to their prior level of function, which is dependent on patient-specific, knee-specific, and sports-specific factors. Despite the fact that subjective patient-reported outcomes are significantly improved in the majority of MAT patients, there is wide variability in the rate at which athletic patients are able to return to sports, when they return, and their ultimate level of performance. We advise active individuals who undergo a MAT to pursue “low-impact” activities based on 10-year survivorship of 70% to 80%. Risk of a recurrent meniscal tear is the most common complication, and the ability of MAT to prevent osteoarthritis is unproven.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1362-1365
Number of pages4
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

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