Eating pathology and obesity in women at risk for breast cancer recurrence

Cheryl L. Rock, Archana J. McEligot, Shirley W. Flatt, Elisa J. Sobo, Denise E. Wilfley, Vicky E. Jones, Kathryn A. Hollenbach, Russell D. Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship among obesity, depressive symptoms, eating attitudes and behaviors, and dietary intake. It compared women at risk for recurrence of breast cancer and women who had not been diagnosed with breast cancer and were recruited from the same community and age group (middle-aged and older). Method: Body mass index (BMI), dietary intake, self-reported depressive symptoms, and eating disorder psychopathology (assessed with the Eating Disorder Examination - Questionnaire [EDE-Q]) were examined in women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 56) and the comparison group of women with no breast cancer history (n = 52). Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with global and subscale EDE-Q scores and BMI. Results: BMI and depressive symptoms were significantly and independently associated with global and subscale EDE-Q scores in women at risk for breast cancer recurrence and women with no breast cancer history. Dietary restriction was also significantly associated with EDE-Q scores in the group with no breast cancer history. Conclusions: An association among obesity, depressive symptomatology, and abnormal eating attitudes and behavior may affect response to standard nutritional interventions in women at risk for breast cancer recurrence. (C) 2000 by John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-179
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000

Keywords

  • Breast cancer recurrence
  • Diet
  • EDE-Q

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