E-cigarette Usage Is Associated with Increased Past-12-Month Quit Attempts and Successful Smoking Cessation in Two US Population-Based Surveys

Linda Johnson, Yinjiao Ma, Sherri L. Fisher, Alex T. Ramsey, Li Shiun Chen, Sarah M. Hartz, Robert C. Culverhouse, Richard A. Grucza, Nancy L. Saccone, Timothy B. Baker, Laura J. Bierut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: We examined past-12-month quit attempts and smoking cessation from 2006 to 2016 while accounting for demographic shifts in the US population. In addition, we sought to understand whether the current use of electronic cigarettes was associated with a change in past-12-month quit attempts and successful smoking cessation at the population level. Methods: We analyzed data from 25- to 44-year-olds from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) from 2006 to 2016 (N = 26,354) and the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) in 2006-2007, 2010-2011, and 2014-2015 (N = 33,627). Data on e-cigarette use were available in the 2014-2016 NHIS and 2014-2015 TUS-CPS surveys. Results: Past-12-month quit attempts and smoking cessation increased in recent years compared with 2006. Current e-cigarette use was associated with higher quit attempts (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.87 to 2.81, p <. 001) and greater smoking cessation (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.21 to 2.21, p =. 001) in the NHIS. Multivariable logistic regression of the TUS-CPS data showed that current e-cigarette use was similarly significantly associated with increased past-12-month quit attempts and smoking cessation. Significant interactions were found for smoking frequency (everyday and some-day smoking) and current e-cigarette use for both outcomes (p <. 0001) with the strongest positive effects seen in everyday smokers. Conclusions: Compared with 2006, past-12-month quit attempts and smoking cessation increased among adults aged 25-44 in recent years. Current e-cigarette use was associated with increased past-12-month quit attempts and successful smoking cessation among established smokers. These findings are relevant to future tobacco policy decisions. Implications: E-cigarettes were introduced into the US market over the past decade. During this period, past-12-month quit attempts and smoking cessation have increased among US adults aged 25-44. These trends are inconsistent with the hypothesis that e-cigarette use is delaying quit attempts and leading to decreased smoking cessation. In contrast, current e-cigarette use was associated with significantly higher past-12-month quit attempts and past-12-month cessation. These findings suggest that e-cigarette use contributes to a reduction in combustible cigarette use among established smokers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1331-1338
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2019

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