Dysregulated coagulation associated with hypofibrinogenaemia and plasma hypercoagulability: Implications for identifying coagulopathic mechanisms in humans

Rita Marchi, Bethany L. Walton, Colleen S. McGary, Feng Chang Lin, Alice D. Ma, Rafal Pawlinski, Nigel MacKman, Robert A. Campbell, Jorge Di Paola, Alisa S. Wolberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Identifying coagulation abnormalities in patients with combined bleeding and thrombosis history is clinically challenging. Our goal was to probe the complexity of dysregulated coagulation in humans by characterizing pathophysiologic mechanisms in a patient with both bleeding and thrombosis. The patient is a 56-year-old female with a history of haematomas, poor wound healing, and thrombosis (retinal artery occlusion and transient cerebral ischaemia). She had a normal activated partial thromboplastin time, prolonged thrombin and reptilase times, and decreased functional and antigenic fibrinogen levels, and was initially diagnosed with hypodysfibrinogenaemia. This diagnosis was supported by DNA analysis revealing a novel FGB mutation (c.656A+ACY-gt+ADs-G) predicting a Q189R mutation in the mature chain that was present in the heterozygote state. However, turbidity analysis showed that purified fibrinogen polymerisation and degradation were indistinguishable from normal, and Bp chain subpopulations appeared normal by two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis, indicating the mutated chain was not secreted. Interestingly, plasma thrombin generation testing revealed the patient's thrombin generation was higher than normal and could be attributed to elevated levels of factor VIII (FVIII, 163-225+ACU-). Accordingly, in an arterial injury model, hypofibrinoge-naemic mice (Fgn+ADw-sup+AD4APA-/sup+AD4-) infused with factorVIII demonstrated significantly shorter vessel occlusion times than saline-infused Fgn+ADw-sup+AD4APA-/sup+AD4- mice.Together, these data associate the complex bleeding and thrombotic presentation with combined hypofibrinogenaemia plus plasma hypercoagulability. These findings suggest previous cases in which fibrinogen abnormalities have been associated with thrombosis may also be complicated by co-existing plasma hypercoagulability and illustrate the importance of global coagulation testing in patients with compound presentations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)516-526
Number of pages11
JournalThrombosis and haemostasis
Volume108
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Bleeding
  • Factor VIII
  • Hypofibrinogenaemia
  • Thrombin generation
  • Thrombosis

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