Dynamic α-Fetoprotein Response and Outcomes after Liver Transplant for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Karim J. Halazun, Russell E. Rosenblatt, Neil Mehta, Quirino Lai, Kaveh Hajifathalian, Andre Gorgen, Gagan Brar, Kazunari Sasaki, Maria B.Majella Doyle, Parissa Tabrizian, Vatche G. Agopian, Marc Najjar, Tommy Ivanics, Benjamin Samstein, Robert S. Brown, Jean C. Emond, Francis Yao, Jan Lerut, Massimo Rossi, Gianluca MenniniSamuele Iesari, Armin Finkenstedt, Benedikt Schaefer, Jans Mittler, Maria Hoppe-Lotichius, Cristiano Quintini, Federico Aucejo, William Chapman, Gonzalo Sapisochin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Accurate preoperative prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence after liver transplant is the mainstay of selection tools used by transplant-governing bodies to discern candidacy for patients with HCC. Although progress has been made, few tools incorporate objective measures of tumor biological characteristics, resulting in inclusion of patients with high recurrence rates and exclusion of others who could otherwise be cured. Objective: To externally validate the New York/California (NYCA) score, a recently published multi-institutional US HCC selection tool that was the first model incorporating a dynamic α-fetoprotein response (AFP-R) and compare the validated score with currently accepted HCC selection tools, namely, the Milan Criteria (MC), the French-AFP (F-AFP), and Metroticket 2.0 models. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective, multicenter prognostic analysis of prospectively collected databases of 2236 adults undergoing liver transplant for HCC was conducted at 3 US, 1 Canadian, and 4 European centers from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2013. The AFP-R was measured as the difference between maximum and final pre-liver transplant AFP level. Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk regression analyses examined recurrence-free and overall survival. Receiver operating characteristic analyses and net reclassification index were used to compare NYCA with MC, F-AFP, and Metroticket 2.0. Data analysis was performed from June 2019 to April 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary study outcome was 5-year recurrence-free survival; overall survival was the secondary outcome. Results: Of 2236 patients, 1808 (80.9%) were men; mean (SD) age was 58.3 (7.96) years. A total of 545 patients (24.4%) did not meet the MC. The NYCA score proved valid on competing risk regression analysis, accurately predicting recurrence-free and overall survival (5-year cumulative incidence of recurrence risk in NYCA risk categories was 9.5% for low-, 20.5%, for acceptable-, and 40.5% for high-risk categories; P <.001 for all). The NYCA also predicted recurrence-free survival on a center-specific level: 453 of 545 patients (83.1%) who did not meet MC, 213 of 308 (69.2%) who did not meet the French-AFP, 292 of 384 (76.1%) who did not meet Metroticket 2.0 would be recategorized into NYCA low- and acceptable-risk groups (>75% 5-year recurrence-free survival). The Harrell C statistic for the validated NYCA score was 0.66 compared with 0.59 for the MC and 0.57 for the F-AFP models (P <.001). The net reclassification index for NYCA was 8.1 vs MC, 12.9 vs F-AFP, and 10.1 vs Metroticket 2.0. Conclusions and Relevance: This study appears to externally validate the importance of AFP-R in the selection of patients with HCC for liver transplant. The AFP-R represents one of the truly objective measures of biological characteristics available before transplantation. Incorporation of AFP-R into selection criteria allows safe expansion of MC and other models, offering liver transplant to patients with acceptable tumor biological characteristics who would otherwise be denied potential cure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-567
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA surgery
Volume156
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

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