DSM-IV defined conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder: An investigation of shared liability in female twins

V. S. Knopik, L. C. Bidwell, C. Flessner, N. Nugent, L. Swenson, K. K. Bucholz, P. A.F. Madden, A. C. Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. DSM-IV specifies a hierarchal diagnostic structure such that an oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) diagnosis is applied only if criteria are not met for conduct disorder (CD). Genetic studies of ODD and CD support a combination of shared genetic and environmental influences but largely ignore the imposed diagnostic structure. Method. We examined whether ODD and CD share an underlying etiology while accounting for DSM-IV diagnostic specifications. Data from 1446 female twin pairs, aged 11-19 years, were fitted to two-stage models adhering to the DSM-IV diagnostic hierarchy. Results. The models suggested that DSM-IV ODD-CD covariation is attributed largely to shared genetic influences. Conclusions. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to examine genetic and environmental overlap among these disorders while maintaining a DSM-IV hierarchical structure. The findings reflect primarily shared genetic influences and specific (i.e. uncorrelated) shared/familial environmental effects on these DSM-IV-defined behaviors. These results have implications for how best to define CD and ODD for future genetically informed analyses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1053-1064
Number of pages12
JournalPsychological medicine
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • conduct disorder
  • genetics
  • oppositional defiant disorder
  • twins

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