Does limiting pre-movement time during practice eliminate the benefit of practicing while expecting to teach?

Marcos Daou, Jence A. Rhoads, Taylor Jacobs, Keith R. Lohse, Matthew W. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Past research has revealed practicing and studying a motor skill with the expectation of teaching it to another person increases the amount of time participants spend preparing for movement during practice trials of the skill. However, it is unknown whether the increased motor preparation time explains the benefit of expecting to teach on motor learning. To address this question, we had participants practice golf putting with the expectation of teaching the skill to another participant the following day or the expectation of being tested on the skill the following day. We limited the motor preparation time for half of the participants who expected to teach and half of the participants who expected to test, and allowed the remaining participants to take as much motor preparation time as they liked. All participants were tested on their putting the next day. We predicted that participants who expected to teach would exhibit superior posttest performance, but this benefit would be exclusive to those participants who also practiced with unlimited motor preparation. Although the current data did not support this hypothesis, we also conducted an exploratory analysis in which we aggregated data from two prior experiments. This cumulative analysis suggested that expecting to teach does indeed enhance motor learning, but not through motor preparation during practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-163
Number of pages11
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Expecting to teach
  • Motor learning
  • Motor preparation

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