Does elimination of planned postoperative radiation to the primary bed in p16-positive, transorally-resected oropharyngeal carcinoma associate with poorer outcomes?

Parul Sinha, Pipkorn Patrik, Wade L. Thorstad, Hiram A. Gay, Bruce H. Haughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective The purpose of our study is to compare oncologic and functional outcomes of p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) patients, in the presence and absence of planned radiation to the primary bed following transoral surgery (TOS), stratified by T-classification. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 261, T1-T4, consecutively TOS-treated OPSCC patients. Results At a median follow-up of 61 months, local recurrence (LR) occurred in 6 (2.3%) patients (3 each in T1-T2 and T3-T4 groups), of which 5 had tumors in the tongue base and one in the tonsil. Of patients not receiving planned primary bed radiation, LR occurred in 3% of T1-T2s versus 17% of T3-T4s. In patients with T1-T2 tumors, Absolute Risk Reduction of LR with primary bed radiation was 3.26% (95% CI: −0.37%, 7%); Number Needed to Treat to prevent one LR was 31 (95% CI: 14.5, 271). Absolute Risk Increase for gastrostomy-tube with primary bed radiation was 34.4% (95% CI: 24%, 45%); Number Needed to Harm was 3 (95% CI: 2.2, 4.2), i.e., for every three patients with T1-T2 tumors receiving primary bed radiation, one had a gastrostomy-tube. Conclusions Elimination of primary bed radiation in margin-negative resected, T1-T2 p16-positive OPSCC was not associated with significant compromise of local control, and correlated with superior swallowing preservation, assessed using gastrostomy rate as a surrogate. Lack of primary bed radiation in T3-T4 tumors associated with significantly increased LR rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-134
Number of pages8
JournalOral Oncology
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Keywords

  • De-escalation
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Oropharynx cancer
  • Postoperative radiation
  • p16 gene
  • p16-positive

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