Distribution of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in ICU-bloodstream infections during hospitalization: a nationwide surveillance study

Rami Sommerstein, Lauro Damonti, Jonas Marschall, Stephan Harbarth, Michael Gasser, Andreas Kronenberg, Niccolò Buetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Changing microorganism distributions and decreasing antibiotic susceptibility over the duration of hospitalization have been described for the colonization or infection of selected organ systems. Few data are available on bacteremias in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. We conducted a nationwide study on bloodstream infection (BSI) using data from the Swiss Centre for Antibiotic Resistance (ANRESIS). We analyzed data on BSI detected in the ICU from hospitals that sent information on a regular basis during the entire study period (2008–2017). We described specific trends of pathogen distribution and resistance during hospitalization duration. We included 6505 ICU- BSI isolates from 35 Swiss hospitals. We observed 2587 possible skin contaminants, 3788 bacteremias and 130 fungemias. The most common microorganism was Escherichia coli (23.2%, 910), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (18.7%, 734) and enterococci (13.1%, 515). Enterococcus spp (p < 0.0001) and Candida spp (p < 0.0001) increased in proportion, whereas E. coli (p < 0.0001) and S. aureus (p < 0.0001) proportions decreased during hospitalization. Resistances against first- and second-line antibiotics increased linearly during hospitalization. Pathogen distribution and antimicrobial resistance in ICU-BSI depends on the duration of the hospitalization. The proportion of enterococcal BSI, candidemia and resistant microorganisms against first- and second-line antibiotics increased during hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16876
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

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