Distinct primary translation products from human liver mRNA give rise to secreted and cell-associated forms of complement protein C2

D. H. Perlmutter, F. S. Cole, G. Goldberger, H. R. Colten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The second component of complement (C2), is a class III major histocompatibility complex gene product and a glycoprotein in the classical complement activating system. Synthesis in the human hepatoma-derived cell line HepG2 results in three intracellular forms: an 84-kDa form secreted in 1-2 h; 79-kDa and 70-kDa forms that remain cell-associated for intervals up to 12 h. All three forms are C2 polypeptides as demonstrated by inhibition of immunoprecipitation with unlabeled C2 and the presence of common major peptide fragments following chymotryptic digestion. The cell-associated forms of C2 are not products of proteolysis as demonstrated by experiments with multiple proteinase inhibitors and by observations of the kinetics of synthesis. Inhibition of core glycosylation by tunicamycin and deglycosylation by acid hydrolysis indicate that the three intracellular C2 polypeptides are glycosylated to a similar extent. Although the 84-kDa form of C2 is susceptible to C1s cleavage the two cell-associated forms are not. Cell-free biosynthesis by mRNA from HepG2 or human liver results in three primary translation products corresponding to the three unglycosylated forms of C2. These results indicate that HepG2 cells synthesize C2 protein in both secreted and cell-associated forms and that each form is derived from a separate primary translation product.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10380-10385
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume259
Issue number16
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

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