Distinct Chronic Post-Viral Lung Diseases upon Infection with Influenza or Parainfluenza Viruses Differentially Impact Superinfection Outcome

Geyon L. Garcia, Alex Valenzuela, Tomaz Manzoni, Andrew E. Vaughan, Carolina B. López

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma remain prevalent human lung diseases. Variability in epithelial and inflammatory components that results in pathologic heterogeneity complicates the development of treatments for these diseases. Early childhood infection with parainfluenza virus or respiratory syncytial virus is strongly associated with the development of asthma and COPD later in life, and exacerbations of these diseases correlate with the presence of viral RNA in the lung. Well-characterized animal models of postviral chronic lung diseases are necessary to study the underlying mechanisms of viral-related COPD and asthma and to develop appropriate therapies. In this study, we cross-analyzed chronic lung disease caused by infection with Sendai virus (SeV) or influenza A virus in mice. Differences were observed in lesion composition and inflammatory profiles between SeV- and influenza A virus–induced long-term lung disease. In addition, a primary SeV infection led to worsened pathologic findings on secondary heterologous viral challenge, whereas the reversed infection scheme protected against disease in response to a secondary viral challenge >1 month after the primary infection. These data demonstrate the differential effect of primary viral infections in the susceptibility to disease exacerbation in response to a different secondary viral infection and highlight the usefulness of these viral models as tools to understand the underlying mechanisms that mediate distinct chronic postviral lung diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)543-553
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume190
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

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