Discriminative stimulus and self-reported effects of methylphenidate, d-amphetamine, and triazolam in methylphenidate-trained humans

William W. Stoops, Joshua A. Lile, Paul E.A. Glaser, Craig R. Rush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Asymmetrical generalization between drugs on drug-discrimination procedures has been demonstrated for sedative and stimulant drugs in animals and to some extent with sedative drugs in humans. The aim of this experiment was to examine the discriminative-stimulus effects of d-amphetamine in methylphenidate-trained humans. A previous study demonstrated that methylphenidate substitutes for d-amphetamine in d-amphetamine-trained humans. Six healthy human participants first learned to discriminate 30 mg oral methylphenidate. Doses of oral methylphenidate, d-amphetamine, triazolam, and placebo were then tested to determine whether they share discriminative-stimulus and self-reported effects with 30 mg methylphenidate. Methylphenidate and d-amphetamine dose-dependently increased methylphenidate-appropriate responding and produced prototypical stimulant-like effects. Triazolam produced low levels of methylphenidate- appropriate responding and prototypical sedative-like effects. The results of this experiment are concordant with previous studies and suggest that the behavioral effects of oral methylphenidate and d-amphetamine overlap extensively and that the discriminative-stimulus effects of methylphenidate and d-amphetamine are symmetrical.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-64
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Discriminative stimulus and self-reported effects of methylphenidate, d-amphetamine, and triazolam in methylphenidate-trained humans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this