Discordance in Reporting of Maternal Aggression: Exploring Differences by Characteristics of Children, Mothers, and Their Environments

Kristen P. Kremer, Jamie S. Kondis, Theodore R. Kremer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated discordant reports of maternal aggression using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 1,606). Multinomial logistic regression models predicted discordant reports of hitting and shouting from child, mother, and environmental characteristics. Compared to dyads in which both mothers and children reported aggression, mothers with a college degree had higher child-only and mother-only reports of both hitting and shouting versus mothers with less than a high school diploma. High-income mothers had higher child-only reports of hitting, while families with past Child Protective Services involvement had higher child-only and mother-only reports of hitting. Additionally, children with lower reading test scores and whose fathers had history of incarceration had higher child-only reports of hitting. Families residing in neighborhoods for which mothers were scared to let children play outside also had higher child-only and mother-only reports of hitting and shouting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-351
Number of pages13
JournalChild Maltreatment
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

Keywords

  • CPS
  • adolescent victims
  • aggressive behavior
  • child abuse
  • disclosure
  • longitudinal research

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