Differential pathlength factor informs evoked stimulus response in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

Alexander J. Lin, Adrien Ponticorvo, Anthony J. Durkin, Vasan Venugopalan, Bernard Choi, Bruce J. Tromberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Baseline optical properties are typically assumed in calculating the differential pathlength factor (DPF) of mouse brains, a value used in the modified Beer-Lambert law to characterize an evoked stimulus response. We used spatial frequency domain imaging to measure in vivo baseline optical properties in 20-month-old control (n=8) and triple transgenic APP/PS1/tau (3xTg-AD) (n=5) mouse brains. Average μa for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 0.82±0.05 and 0.65±0.05 mm-1, respectively, at 460 nm; and 0.71±0.04 and 0.55±0.04 mm-1, respectively, at 530 nm. Average μs′ for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 1.5±0.1 and 1.7±0.1 mm-1, respectively, at 460 nm; and 1.3±0.1 and 1.5±0.1 mm-1, respectively, at 530 nm. The calculated DPF for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 0.58±0.04 and 0.64±0.04 OD mm, respectively, at 460 nm; and 0.66±0.03 and 0.73±0.05 OD mm, respectively, at 530 nm. In hindpaw stimulation experiments, the hemodynamic increase in brain tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin was threefold larger and two times longer in the control mice compared to 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, the washout of deoxyhemoglobin from increased brain perfusion was seven times larger in controls compared to 3xTg-AD mice (p<0.05).

Original languageEnglish
Article number045001
JournalNeurophotonics
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Keywords

  • LED microprojector
  • absorption
  • cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen
  • functional activation
  • scattering
  • spatial frequency domain imaging
  • tissue optics

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