Dietary fat and protein in relation to risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women

Shumin Zhang, David J. Hunter, Bernard A. Rosner, Graham A. Colditz, Charlie S. Fuchs, Frank E. Speizer, Walter C. Willett

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117 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma occurs more frequently in individuals with suppressed immune status, and some types of dietary fat and protein have been associated with decreased immune responses. In this study, we examined the intake of specific types of dietary fat and protein in relation to the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods: We documented 199 incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a cohort of 88 410 women, who were enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study and were aged 34-60 years in 1980, during 14 years of follow-up. Relative risks of the disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. All P values are two-sided and were considered to be statistically significant for P<.05. Results: Intake of saturated fat was associated with an increase in risk that was not statistically significant; the multivariate relative risk for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of intake was 1.4 (95% CI = 0.7-3.0; P for trend = .42). Intake of beef, pork, or lamb as a main dish was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; the multivariate relative risk for consumption of these meats at least once per day as compared with less than once per week was 2.2 (95% CI = 1.1-4.4; P for trend = .002). Higher intake of trans unsaturated fat was also statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of the disease; the multivariate relative risk for the highest versus the lowest quintiles was 2.4 (95% CI = 1.3-4.6; P for trend = .01). Higher intake of red meat cooked by broiling or barbecuing-but not by roasting, pan-frying, or boiling or stewing - was associated with an increase in risk that was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Greater dietary intake of certain meats and fats was associated with a higher risk of non- Hodgkin's lymphoma. These relationships and their potential mechanisms deserve further examination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1751-1758
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume91
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 1999
Externally publishedYes

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    Zhang, S., Hunter, D. J., Rosner, B. A., Colditz, G. A., Fuchs, C. S., Speizer, F. E., & Willett, W. C. (1999). Dietary fat and protein in relation to risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 91(20), 1751-1758. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/91.20.1751