Depressive symptoms, eating psychopathology, and physical activity in obese breast cancer survivors

Karen Yeter, Cheryl L. Rock, Bilge Pakiz, Wayne A. Bardwell, Jeanne F. Nichols, Denise E. Wilfley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Psychosocial problems such as depression are present as long-term sequelae of breast cancer and its treatment in a substantial minority of patients. In general and patient populations, lifestyle factors such as obesity and physical activity have been associated with depression, and these and related characteristics may be associated with depression in breast cancer survivors. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine factors associated with depression in overweight or obese women (n = 85) who had been diagnosed and treated for early stage breast cancer. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck depression inventory (BDI), eating psychopathology was assessed with the eating disorder examination - questionnaire (EDE-Q), and physical activity was estimated with the seven-day physical activity recall. BDI was directly correlated with global EDE-Q score (r = 0.56, P < 0.01) and inversely associated with age (r = -0.22, P < 0.05) in bivariate analysis. Controlling for body mass index, age, education and other factors, BDI was directly associated with global EDE-Q score (P < 0.001) and inversely associated with level of physical activity (P < 0.05) in a model that explained 61% of the variance. Eating attitudes and behaviors, and physical activity level, are independently associated with depressive symptoms in overweight or obese breast cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-462
Number of pages10
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Depression
  • Lifestyle
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity

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