COVID-19: Factors Predicting Depressive Symptoms in People Aging With Long-Term Physical Disabilities

Szu Wei Chen, Susan Rice, Katelyn Storey, Marian Keglovits, Megen Devine, Yan Yan, Susan Stark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic may be greater than that of the viral infection. This impact is likely greater for disadvantaged groups such as people with long-term physical disabilities (PwLTPD). This cross-sectional study used a multiple linear regression model to examine factors associated with depressive symptoms and to understand their relative importance during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The model explained 58% of the variance in depressive symptoms. Anxiety was the most important predictor, accounting for 8% of variance. Higher levels of anxiety, loneliness, and financial stress; prior diagnosis of depression; and non-Black race predicted a higher level of depressive symptoms in PwLTPD during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Occupational therapy practitioners should strategically acknowledge predictors of depression that cannot be modified and actively address those that can be modified through evidence-based interventions to improve depressive symptoms in PwLTPD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOTJR Occupation, Participation and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • depression
  • mental health
  • occupational therapy
  • pandemic
  • people with disabilities

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