Correlates of health information seeking between adults diagnosed with and without cancer

Eric Adjei Boakye, Kahee A. Mohammed, Christian J. Geneus, Betelihem B. Tobo, Lorinette S. Wirth, Lei Yang, Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose To examine predictors of information seeking behavior among individuals diagnosed with cancer versus those without. Methods Cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycles 1–3 (October 2011 to November 2013) were analyzed for 10,774 survey respondents aged 18 years. Binary logistic regression was used to examine the effect of socio-demographic and behavioral factors on health information seeking. Results Cancer diagnosis did not predict health information seeking. However, respondents diagnosed with cancer were more likely to seek health information from a healthcare practitioner. Compared to males, females were more likely to seek health information irrespective of cancer diagnosis. Regardless of cancer diagnosis, those without a regular healthcare provider were less likely to seek health information. Likelihood of seeking health information declined across education strata, and significantly worsened among respondents without high school diplomas irrespective of cancer diagnosis. Conclusions Respondents sought health information irrespective of cancer diagnosis. However, the source of health information sought differed by cancer diagnosis. Gender, education, and having a regular healthcare provider were predictors of health information seeking. Future health communication interventions targeting cancer patients and the general public should consider these findings for tailored interventions to achieve optimal results.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0196446
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

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