Core Functions of Communication in Pediatric Medicine: an Exploratory Analysis of Parent and Patient Narratives

Bryan A. Sisk, Annie B. Friedrich, Jessica Mozersky, Heidi Walsh, James DuBois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Communication in pediatrics is important for psychological well-being and health outcomes. However, consensus is lacking regarding the core functions of communication in pediatrics. The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate whether and how core communication functions from adult oncology apply to communication in pediatric medicine and (2) to examine whether any unique core communication functions exist in pediatric medicine. We analyzed 36 narratives written by parents (n = 23) or former patients (n = 13) describing pediatric communication experiences with clinicians that were published in Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics. Utilizing deductive and inductive coding, we evaluated narratives for evidence of core communication functions previously documented in adult oncology. We also evaluated for novel functions not represented in adult oncology. We identified the presence of all adult core communication functions in pediatric narratives. We also found evidence of a novel function, “engendering solidarity and validation.” We report clinician behaviors that appeared to facilitate or impair these core functions. Core communication functions in adult oncology apply to communication in pediatric medicine, but we also identified a novel communication function in pediatrics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Keywords

  • Communication
  • Patient reported outcomes
  • Pediatrics

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