Convergence and divergence of exercise-based approaches that incorporate motor control for the management of low back pain

Julie A. Hides, Ronald Donelson, Diane Lee, Heidi Prather, Shirley A. Sahrmann, Paul W. Hodges

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many approaches for low back pain (LBP) management focus on modifying motor control, which refers to motor, sensory, and central processes for control of posture and movement. A common assumption across approaches is that the way an individual loads the spine by typical postures, movements, and muscle activation strategies contributes to LBP symptom onset, persistence, and recovery. However, there are also divergent features from one approach to another. This commentary presents key principles of 4 clinical physical therapy approaches, including how each incorporates motor control in LBP management, the convergence and divergence of these approaches, and how they interface with medical LBP management. The approaches considered are movement system impairment syndromes of the lumbar spine, Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, motor control training, and the integrated systems model. These were selected to represent the diversity of applications, including approaches using motor control as a central or an adjunct feature, and approaches that are evidence based or evidence informed. This identification of areas of convergence and divergence of approaches is designed to clarify the key aspects of each approach and thereby serve as a guide for the clinician and to provide a platform for considering a hybrid approach tailored to the individual patient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-452
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Clinical perspectives
  • Low back pain
  • Motor control
  • Spinal control

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