Contacting domains segregate a lipid transporter from a solute transporter in the malarial host–parasite interface

Matthias Garten, Josh R. Beck, Robyn Roth, Tatyana Tenkova-Heuser, John Heuser, Eva S. Istvan, Christopher K.E. Bleck, Daniel E. Goldberg, Joshua Zimmerberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The malaria parasite interfaces with its host erythrocyte (RBC) using a unique organelle, the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The mechanism(s) are obscure by which its limiting membrane, the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM), collaborates with the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) to support the transport of proteins, lipids, nutrients, and metabolites between the cytoplasm of the parasite and the cytoplasm of the RBC. Here, we demonstrate that the PV has structure characterized by micrometer-sized regions of especially close apposition between the PVM and the PPM. To determine if these contact sites are involved in any sort of transport, we localize the PVM nutrient-permeable and protein export channel EXP2, as well as the PPM lipid transporter PfNCR1. We find that EXP2 is excluded from, but PfNCR1 is included within these regions of close apposition. We conclude that the host-parasite interface is structured to segregate those transporters of hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3825
JournalNature communications
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

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