Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD): The first twenty years

Gerda G. Fillenbaum, Gerald van Belle, John C. Morris, Richard C. Mohs, Suzanne S. Mirra, Patricia C. Davis, Pierre N. Tariot, Jeremy M. Silverman, Christopher M. Clark, Kathleen A. Welsh-Bohmer, Albert Heyman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

219 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) was funded by the National Institute on Aging in 1986 to develop standardized, validated measures for the assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present report describes the measures that CERAD developed during its first decade and their continued use in their original and translated forms. These measures include clinical, neuropsychological, neuropathologic, and behavioral assessments of AD and also assessment of family history and parkinsonism in AD. An approach to evaluating neuroimages did not meet the standards desired. Further evaluations that could not be completed because of lack of funding (but where some materials are available) include evaluation of very severe AD and of service use and need by patient and caregiver. The information that was developed in the U.S. and abroad permits standardized assessment of AD in clinical practice, facilitates epidemiologic studies, and provides information valuable for individual and public health planning. CERAD materials and data remain available for those wishing to use them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-109
Number of pages14
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • CERAD
  • Clinical assessment
  • Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease
  • Incidence
  • Neuropathological assessment
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Norms
  • Prevalence

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