Congenitally Corrected Transposition Cardiac Surgery: Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database Analysis

Joshua D. Chew, Kevin D. Hill, Jonathan H. Soslow, Marshall L. Jacobs, Jeffrey P. Jacobs, Pirooz Eghtesady, Dylan Thibault, Karen Chiswell, David P. Bichell, Justin Godown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) has many management strategies, with the emergence of anatomic repair increasing the available surgical options. Contemporary surgical practices have not been described in multicenter analyses. This study describes the distribution of heart surgery in patients with ccTGA and defines contemporary outcomes in a large multicenter cohort. Methods: Index cardiovascular operations in patients with primary or fundamental diagnosis of ccTGA were identified in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database from 2010 to 2019. Operations of interest were combined into mutually exclusive groups designating overall ccTGA management strategies. Outcomes were defined with standard Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database definitions. Pearson χ2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistical comparisons. Results: One hundred one centers performed 985 index operations, with anatomic repair the most common approach. Twenty-six centers performed more than 10 operations. Atrial switch plus Rastelli operations had the highest rate of operative mortality (8.4%) and major complications (38.2%). Heart transplant operations had the longest postoperative length of stay among survivors (18 days [interquartile range, 13.5-26]). Conclusions: Patients with ccTGA remain a challenging cohort, with significant diversity in the operations used and a substantial burden of operative mortality and morbidity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

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