Computer-reconstructed radiographs are as good as plain radiographs for assessment of acetabular fractures.

Joseph Borrelli, Michael Peelle, Elizabeth McFarland, Bradley Evanoff, William M. Ricci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Radiographic evaluation of acutely injured patients with a displaced acetabular fracture usually includes plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans. Because of patient and technologist factors, plain radiographs can be compromised and therefore can be insufficient for assessment of the fractured acetabulum. We conducted a study to determine whether computer-reconstructed radiographs (CRRs), plain radiograph-like images created from CT data, are equivalent to traditional radiographs for assessment of acetabular fractures. Five orthopedic surgeons with various trauma experience compared 77 radiographic images from 11 retrospectively identified patients with a displaced acetabular fracture. CRRs were found to be equal to plain radiographs for fracture pattern recognition, image clarity, level of information provided, and overall reviewer satisfaction. Reviewers were confident in their ability to assess fractures using CRRs and found them more aesthetically pleasing than plain radiographs. CRRs provide information equal to that of plain radiographs for assessment of displaced acetabular fractures and have the potential to overcome the problems associated with patient factors (discomfort, body habitus, fracture pattern, presence of overlying osseous structures, bowel gas and intestinal contrast materials) and technologist factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-459; discussion 460
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume37
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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