Computational and experimental physics performance characterization of the neutron capture therapy research facility at Washington State University

D. W. Nigg, P. E. Sloan, J. R. Venhuizen, C. A. Wemple, G. E. Tripard, K. Fox, E. Corwin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

This paper summarizes the results of the final beam characterization measurements for a dual mode epithermal-thermal beam facility for neutron capture therapy research that was recently constructed at the Washington State University TRIGA™ research reactor. The results show that the performance of the beam facility is consistent with the design computations and with international standards for the intended application. A useful epithermal neutron flux of 1.3 × 109 n/cm2-s is produced at the irradiation point with the beam in epithermal mode and shaped by a 10-cm circular aperture plate. When the beam is thermalized with approximately 34 cm of heavy water, the useful thermal flux at the irradiation point is approximately 3.5 × 108 n/cm2-s. The new WSU facility is one of only two such installations currently operating in the US.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPHYSOR-2006 - American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
EventPHYSOR-2006 - American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: Sep 10 2006Sep 14 2006

Publication series

NamePHYSOR-2006 - American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics
Volume2006

Conference

ConferencePHYSOR-2006 - American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period09/10/0609/14/06

Keywords

  • BNCT
  • Boron
  • Epithermal neutron beam
  • Neutron capture therapy
  • Neutron spectrometry
  • Thermal neutron beam
  • Triga™

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