Complications in pediatric cochlear implants

Jonathan McJunkin, Anita Jeyakumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the complications of pediatric patients undergoing cochlear implantation at a tertiary referral center. Method: Institutional review board permission was obtained. A retrospective analysis of all pediatric patients (younger than 18 years) who underwent primary cochlear implantation was performed from January 2001 to December 2005. The patients were reviewed for demographic information, type of hearing loss, cochlear implant device, and complications including implant failure, meningitis, hematoma, implant extrusion, cerebrospinal fluid leak, facial palsy, and wound infection. Results: One hundred sixty-five patient records were reviewed. Twenty-nine patients were lost to follow-up or were revision cases; therefore, 136 records were analyzed. Of the patients, 53.5% were male. The most common etiology of hearing loss was nonsyndromic, nongenetic, congenital sensorineural hearing loss (60.6%). Other less common etiology of hearing loss included TORCH (toxoplasmosis, other infections, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus) (8.3%), connexin mutation (5.8%), and enlarged vestibular aqueduct (6.5%). All patients had a follow-up of 3 years. There were no intraoperative complications. The most common complications were flap infections (2.6%) and immediate postoperative hematomas (1.9%). Flap problems mostly occurred within 2 weeks of implantation. Within the study period, there was only one device failure (0.7%). Conclusions: Cochlear implantation in children continues to be reliable and safe in experienced hands, with a low percentage of severe complications. The patients should have a lifetime follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-113
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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