Cognitive functioning as a contraindication to organ transplant surgery: dilemmas encountered in medical decision making

Teresa L. Collins, E. Wayne Holden, Janet N. Scheel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

A case is presented to illustrate some of the difficulties encountered when providing psychological consultation to evaluate the readiness of patients for pediatric heart-lung transplantation. The outcome of complex medical decision making can often hinge on information provided by the psychological consultant who is attempting to simultaneously serve the needs of the patient as well as the transplant team. Ethical dilemmas frequently arise when medical decision making is driven by limited health care resources and cost constraints. The utility of cognitive functioning as a variable in pediatric transplant decision making is discussed. Recommendations are made for further work in this area on both conceptual and empirical grounds to guide the integration of psychological information into transplant decision making as health care delivery continues to evolve in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-422
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of clinical psychology in medical settings
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Cognitive functioning
  • Heart-lung transplantation
  • Medical decision making

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