Co-occurring risk factors for alcohol dependence and habitual smoking: Update on findings from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism

Richard A. Grucza, Laura J. Bierut

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Habitual smoking and alcohol dependence frequently co-occur, and the genetic factors that influence both conditions appear to overlap. The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) has investigated genetic factors that contribute to both alcohol dependence and habitual smoking. Using a sample of families densely affected with alcohol dependence, COGA investigators have identified regions of the genome likely to contain genes that specifically contribute to alcohol dependence and habitual smoking, as well as regions likely to contain genes that contribute to the development of both conditions. Further genetic analyses (i.e., candidate gene studies) have helped identify specific genes that may contribute to the development of alcohol dependence and habitual smoking. These analyses have implicated several genes that encode parts of receptors for the neurotransmitter gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA) in the development of alcohol or nicotine dependence, respectively. Other studies have identified additional candidate genes for alcohol or nicotine dependence. The results to date suggest that both common and drug-specific genetic influences play a role in the development of alcohol and nicotine dependence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-178
Number of pages7
JournalAlcohol Research and Health
Volume29
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol and tobacco
  • Animal models
  • Animal studies
  • Biological basis
  • Co-abuse
  • Co-use
  • Cross-tolerance
  • Genetics
  • Mesolimbic dopamine system
  • Nicotine
  • Selected strains

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