Clinical impact of functional testing strategy among stented and non-stented patients: Insights from the ROSETTA Registry

Koon Hou Mak, Mark J. Eisenberg, Janius Tsang, K. Okrainiec, Thao Huynh, David L. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The clinical utility of routine functional testing following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) among patients with and without coronary stenting is unclear. We established an international registry to evaluate the functional testing strategies following successful PCI. Among patients treated with stents, adverse cardiovascular outcomes were similar between those who underwent routine or clinically-driven functional testing. Conversely, among those who were not treated with stents, the rate of death, myocardial infarction or unstable angina was lower than those who underwent routine functional testing (14.8% vs. 6.6%; P=0.033). Our study suggests that routine functional testing may be beneficial to patients not treated with stents. Background: The role of routine functional testing following successful PCI is unclear. By improving patient outcomes with coronary stenting, the value of such a strategy may diminish. Hypothesis: To determine the clinical utility of routine functional testing following PCI between patients with and without stenting. Methods: The routine versus selective exercise testing after angioplasty (ROSETTA) Registry was established to evaluate the utilization of functional testing following PCI. Use of functional testing, either routine or selective (clinically-driven), was left to the discretion of the attending physician. Results: Of 791 patients enrolled, 462 (58%) underwent coronary stenting. Stented patients were less likely to suffer from concomitant diseases but had more complex angiographic morphological characteristics. Between the groups of patients with and without stents, there was no difference in the proportion of patients undergoing routine functional testing (24% vs. 36%) or subsequent cardiac procedures (18.4% vs. 16.0%). Among patients with stents, outcomes at 6 months were similar between the groups undergoing routine and selective functional testing, including death (0% vs. 1.7%), myocardial infarction (0.9% vs. 2.0%), unstable angina (9.9% vs. 13.7%), repeat angiography (16.2% vs. 16.9%) and revascularization procedures (11.7% vs. 10.8%). However, among non-stented patients, selective functional testing was associated with a higher occurrence of death, myocardial infarction or unstable angina (14.8% vs. 6.6%; P=0.033). There was also no difference in the rates of repeat coronary angiography or revascularization procedures between these two strategies. Conclusion: Although routine functional testing has little impact on outcomes among patients treated with coronary stents, non-stented patients may derive particular benefit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-327
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume95
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004

Keywords

  • Functional testing
  • Resource utilization
  • Restenosis
  • Revascularization
  • Stent

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