Clinical and Translational Implications of an Emerging Developmental Substructure for Autism

John N. Constantino, Tony Charman, Emily J.H. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

A vast share of the population-attributable risk for autism relates to inherited polygenic risk. A growing number of studies in the past five years have indicated that inherited susceptibility may operate through a finite number of early developmental liabilities that, in various permutations and combinations, jointly predict familial recurrence of the convergent syndrome of social communication disability that defines the condition. Here, we synthesize this body of research to derive evidence for a novel developmental substructure for autism, which has profound implications for ongoing discovery efforts to elucidate its neurobiological causes, and to inform future clinical and biomarker studies, early interventions, and personalized approaches to therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-389
Number of pages25
JournalAnnual Review of Clinical Psychology
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 2021

Keywords

  • Canalization
  • Causation
  • Development
  • Endophenotype
  • Infancy
  • Inheritance

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