Chamber properties from transmitral flow: Prediction of average and passive left ventricular diastolic stiffness

Jennifer B. Lisauskas, Jasvindar Singh, Andrew W. Bowman, Sándor J. Kovács

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

A chamber stiffness (KLV)-transmitral flow (E-wave) deceleration time relation has been invasively validated in dogs with the use of average stiffness [(ΔP/ΔV)avg]. KLV is equivalent to kE, the (E-wave) stiffness of the parameterized diastolic filling model. Prediction and validation of 1) (ΔP/ΔV)avg in terms of kE, 2) early rapid-filling stiffness [(ΔP/ΔV)E] in terms of kE, and 3) passive (postdiastasis) chamber stiffness [(ΔP/ΔV)PD] from A waves in terms of the stiffness parameter for the Doppler A wave (kA) have not been achieved. Simultaneous micromanometric left ventricular (LV) pressure (LVP) and transmitral flow from 131 subjects were analyzed. (ΔP)avg and (ΔV)avg utilized the minimum LVP-LV end-diastolic pressure interval. (ΔP/ΔV)E utilized ΔP and ΔV from minimum LVP to E-wave termination. (ΔP/ΔV)PD utilized atrial systolic ΔP and ΔV. E- and A-wave analysis generated kE and kA. For all subjects, noninvasive-invasive relations yielded the following equations: kE = 1,401·(ΔP/ΔV)avg + 59.2 (r = 0.84) and kE = 229.0·(ΔP/ΔV)E + 112 (r = 0.80). For subjects with diastasis (n = 113), kA = 1,640·(ΔP/ΔV)PD - 8.40 (r = 0.89). As predicted, kA showed excellent correlation with (ΔP/ΔV)PD; kE correlated highly with (ΔP/ΔV)avg. In vivo validation of average, early, and passive chamber stiffness facilitates quantitative, noninvasive diastolic function assessment from transmitral flow.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-162
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume91
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 5 2001

Keywords

  • Diastole
  • Echocardiography
  • Hemodynamics
  • Mathematical modeling
  • Ventricles

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