Cell type- and stimulus-specific mechanisms for post-transcriptional control of neutrophil chemokine gene expression

Thomas Hamilton, Xiaoxia Li, Michael Novotny, Paul G. Pavicic, Shyamasree Datta, Chenyang Zhao, Justin Hartupee, Dongxu Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

mRNAs encoding inflammatory chemokines that recruit neutrophils frequently exhibit short half-lives that serve to limit their expression under inappropriate conditions but are often prolonged to ensure adequate levels during inflammatory response. Extracellular stimuli that modulate the stability of such mRNAs may be the same as the transcriptional activator, as is the case with TLR ligands, or may cooperate with independent transcriptional stimuli, as with IL-17, which extends the half-life of TNF-induced transcripts. These different stimuli engage independent signaling pathways that target different instability mechanisms distinguished by dependence on different regulatory nucleotide sequence motifs within the 3'UTRs, which involve that action of different mRNA-binding proteins. The selective use of these pathways by different stimuli and in distinct cell populations provides the potential for tailoring of chemokine expression patterns to meet specific needs in different pathophysiologic circumstances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-383
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Leukocyte Biology
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • mRNA degradation

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