Catch me if you can⋯early simulation efforts affect fundamental surgical skill assessment scores

Eeeln H. Buckarma, Becca L. Gas, T. K. Pandian, Jad M. Abdelsattar, Moustafa M. El Khatib, Monali Mohan, Nimesh D. Naik, David R. Farley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background We evaluated whether early exposure to a simulation curriculum enhances acquired surgical skills. Methods The "Surgical Olympics" evaluates interns on basic surgical skills and knowledge. After the Summer Olympics (July), interns were randomly divided into groups: "A" participated in a 7-week curriculum once a week, whereas "B" attended 7 weeks of lectures once a week. All interns then participated in the October Olympics. The 2 groups then switched. Finally, all interns completed a January Olympics. Results Scores were tabulated for the July, October, and January Olympics. Mean scores (A = 182 ± 42, Group B = 188 ± 34; P =.70) were similar in July; in October, group A (mean score = 237 ± 31) outperformed group B (mean score = 200 ± 32; P =.01). Mean total scores in January (A = 290 ± 34, B = 276 ± 34; P =.32) were similar. Conclusions Early exposure to a surgical simulation curriculum enhances surgical intern performance in our Surgical Olympics. Subsequent simulation experience helps learners close this gap.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)583-588
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume211
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Education
  • Simulation
  • Surgery interns
  • Training

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