Brief Report: Chimpanzee Social Responsiveness Scale (CSRS) Detects Individual Variation in Social Responsiveness for Captive Chimpanzees

Carley Faughn, Natasha Marrus, Jeremy Shuman, Stephen R. Ross, John N. Constantino, John R. Pruett, Daniel J. Povinelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Comparative studies of social responsiveness, a core impairment in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), will enhance our understanding of typical and atypical social behavior. We previously reported a quantitative, cross-species (human–chimpanzee) social responsiveness measure, which included the development of the Chimpanzee Social Responsiveness Scale (CSRS). Here, we augment our prior CSRS sample with 25 zoo chimpanzees at three sites: combined N = 54. The CSRS demonstrated strong interrater reliability, and low-ranked chimpanzees, on average, displayed higher CSRS scores. The CSRS continues to discriminate variation in chimpanzee social responsiveness, and the association of higher scores with lower chimpanzee social standing has implications for the relationship between autistic traits and human social status. Continued comparative investigations of social responsiveness will enhance our understanding of underlying impairments in ASD, improve early diagnosis, and inform future therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1483-1488
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of autism and developmental disorders
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Chimpanzee
  • Comparative cognition
  • Nonhuman primate
  • Social Responsiveness Scale

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